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Maybe you're here because you've watched one of the WIXOSS anime series and want to know more about the card game. Maybe you're here because you're a TCG fan and want to try another new thing out. Maybe you're here for the moé designs (aren't we all).

In any of these cases, you've come to the right place.


What is WIXOSS?

WIXOSS is a trading card game where you control a LRIG from the start of the game. During the course of the game, you can grow your LRIG into more powerful forms, and summon SIGNI to fight for your LRIG. The object of the game is to crush all seven of your opponent's life cloth, leaving them vulnerable to a final attack that if successful, wins you the game. To defend against enemy attacks, players can put SIGNI in the way of enemy SIGNI and use ARTS and Guards to defend themselves from damage. Upon taking damage, players can use the crushed cards' Life Burst effects to make a comeback.

In WIXOSS, there are 30 playable LRIGs, each sorted into one of five colors: White white, Red red, Blue blue, Green green, and Black black. Each LRIG has its own unique abilities, strengths, and weaknesses, partially determined by its color.

Compared to other card games, WIXOSS:

  • Is very skill-based. Complex decisions are made throughout the entire game, including how to maximize your resources' impact and when to use your ARTS (which are a precious limited resource). There is usually more than one valid line of play, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. The chance of random variance affecting the result decreases as the game goes on; drawing two cards every turn, the constant accessibility of ARTS, and the high amount of draw and search effects mean that winning or losing by the luck of the draw is rarely a factor.
  • Has a lot of back-and-forth. One player securing an early advantage and staying ahead the entire match rarely happens due to the high amount of comeback mechanics. Due to Life Bursts and banished SIGNI going to the Ener Zone, executing a powerful play comes with the drawback that your opponent (if they survive) has more resources to utilize on their next turn. The more damaging the play, the more resources they have to launch a counterattack with.
  • Allows for plenty of deck-building options. While most decks primarily run cards of a certain color and class, there is enough flexibility allowed by Multi Ener and the aforementioned lack of draw randomness such that unusual, unexpected, situational tech choices are perfectly usable, and in some decks, recommended to play around vulnerabilities in your own, as well as your opponents' decks. Situational cards can be used at one or two copies, and still have an impact on the game without suffering too much consistency loss.
  • Unusual playstyles, like keeping your LRIG at level 2 for the entire game, or bending the game rules to your advantage are available to those who are willing to take a step outside the standard decks. There are plenty of opportunities for creativity and expression in the way you build and play your decks.
  • Has minimal power creep. Power creep is inevitable, and new cards may cause some older cards to lose relevancy. However, the introduction of newer cards increases the pool of competitive cards (by increasing the amount of competitive options) more than it causes obsolescence (by being strictly better than older cards).
  • Has cute girls.

Will WIXOSS ever be released in English?

No.

WIXOSS communities

Before you get into this game, you're gonna need to find people who will show you the ropes. Obviously, I am one of them, but I can't be the only one. There are plenty of people out there experienced in the game who can give you advice about decks and rules, respond to requests for games, or make memes.

The most prominent English-speaking WIXOSS community, as far as I know, is the Card Games Discord server (you can also find a link on the right side of this very page). It's active and has plenty of WIXOSS players. There's a WIXOSS-dedicated Discord, but while most people have access to it, no one actually uses it to talk, instead using the Card Games server. This wiki is also a community in the loosest sense, in that there is a small group of people who frequently post comments on the wiki; however, it's hard to get them together for any consistent discussion. Still, there are people here, and any questions on rulings will be answered. There is also a subreddit, but it's inactive; no one keeps an eye on it except me. But it exists, and people post on it occasionally.

Learning the game

Once you've met up with someone from one of the above communities, it's time for you to finally learn the game. This wiki has pages about basic game flow, located at Gameplay, as well as info about the colors, LRIGs, game zones, and card types, and there is the old translated rulesheet to consult, but the best way to learn the game is by playing.

After asking someone to teach you how to play, you should head to WEBXOSS. Since WEBXOSS automates the rules and card effects, it's the best place for learning the game, although since it's far behind on card sets, it's not the best place to play present-day competitive WIXOSS. Get in a lobby, note that the default deck is "WHITE_HOPE", and start a game. (If you want, you can find another starter deck, go to WEBXOSS's deckbuilder, and make that instead. White Hope works perfectly fine, though.) Play a few games to get used to the rules, and once you feel comfortable enough with the game rules, you can start deciding what LRIG you want to play.

For more advanced players, Cockatrice is recommended for planning decks.

Choose Your LRIG

The primary division between decks in WIXOSS—analogous to color in Magic: the Gathering or clan in Cardfight!! Vanguard—is the LRIG. Each LRIG has its own unique abilities, strengths, and weaknesses.

Note that there are two formats in WIXOSS, All-Star and Key Selection, the latter of which is a recent invention and only uses cards from WXK-P01 Klaxon and onward. Key Selector tournaments are more common than All-Star tournaments. Not all LRIGs are currently available in Key Selection; the LRIGs that are will be marked with a Key symbol.

White White

White LRIGs are balanced in offense and defense, but lean towards defense. They focus on effects that search for SIGNI, allowing them a degree of field consistency, and have many abilities that prevent attacks.

Red Red

Red LRIGs have the philosophy "the best defense is a good offense," and thus aim to quickly overwhelm early defenses and crush the enemy's life cloth quickly during the early game, taking advantage of decks that need time to solidify a position.

Blue Blue

Blue LRIGs are designed defensively and play on draw, hand control, and spell manipulation as their strengths. They excel best in the long game, first by forcing a stalemate, then whittling down the opponent's resources through slow, consistent play.

Green Green

Green LRIGs vary between offense and defense. They focus on overpowering the opponent's SIGNI with larger SIGNI (forcing the opponent to use ARTS or other means to remove them, as attacking over them will be a challenge), as well as accumulating cards in the ener zone, the game's mana equivalent. This enables them to use higher cost ARTS (such as Retribution) with relative ease.

Black Black

Black LRIGs are balanced in offense and defense. They focus on removing enemy SIGNI through power decrease and manipulating/increasing the trash, the game's discard pile equivalent. They are able to defend and attack equally well, taking advantage of their versatile ARTS and SIGNI that are usable both offensively and defensively.

Other

How to Build a Deck

Now that you've chosen a LRIG, it's time to build a deck around that LRIG.

Firstly, the deck-building rules:

  • The deck must consist of exactly 40 black bordered cards (SIGNI and spells). Exactly 20 of these cards must have a Life Burst. You may use a maximum of 4 copies of a particular card.
  • The LRIG deck must consist of 10 white bordered cards (LRIGs, ARTS, Resonas, and Keys), with no more than 1 copy of a particular card.

There are two formats: Key Selection and All-Star. Formats change what card pools are available. All-Star allows all cards from the entirety of WIXOSS's history, while Key Selection only allows cards from a smaller pool of recent sets. Key Selection also only has a limited selection of LRIGs: Layla, Piruluk, Midoriko, Guzuko, Tama, Remember, Ril, Carnival, Eternal, Iona, Eldora, Yuzuki, LoV, Umr, Urith, Emma, Mel, Myu, Hanayo, Tawil, Nanashi and Nijisanji. will eventually be available.) While it may sound less restrictive to build your deck choosing cards from all sets, a smaller card pool is easier to learn, and easier to play with.

Deck structure is loose in WIXOSS. Assuming you plan your deck around a certain level 4 LRIG, People tend to run:

  • 10-14 level 1 SIGNI.
  • 8-12 level 4 SIGNI.
  • 6-8 guards, often lower-leveled ones to fill out your early game SIGNI slots.
  • No guidelines on level 2s and 3s, just use ones with good effects.

How to Start Playing

In most cases, you will have to ask for a game through one of the above communication channels rather than wait in the lobby.

Cockatrice

  • Manual card movement and ruling resolution
  • Somewhat difficult to learn movement
  • Has all sets and is currently actively updated
  • Most common online simulator
  • Requires download

Buying Real-Life Cards

  • Manual card movement and ruling resolution
  • Can be expensive
  • Lack of real-life environment to play in, particularly outside Japan
  • Most players play online rather than IRL making it difficult to find people to play with
  • Cards cannot be play tested before release

Advanced tips

A few notes:

  • At the start of the game, swap every spell and level 3 and 4 SIGNI in your hand out so that you can draw early-game SIGNI. If you don't already have two level 1 SIGNI, swap out the level 2 SIGNI as well.
  • Do not be afraid to take damage early on. Take the first one or two damage, guarding early on, while easy to do, may deprive you of Ener you need to make plays later on.
  • Attacking SIGNI is not always the best decision. The purpose of attacking SIGNI is to reduce the opponent's hand and field, but in a game like WIXOSS where resources can be regenerated quickly, this isn't as impactful as it seems. Furthermore, attacking your opponent's SIGNI gives them Ener, which gives them more opportunities to use ARTS and abilities to counterattack.
  • If your opponent is playing in a strange manner, start reading the cards he has in his trash and Ener zone, as well as field before deciding whether you want to commit. You may be walking into a massive counterattack.
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